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Students win Best in Show and first place awards at the State Fair Student Art Competition

Three Horry County Schools students won top honors at the 2019 South Carolina State Fair Student Art Competition. This annual showcase contest is open to students throughout South Carolina who may enter one of multiple categories per grade level.

Katelynn Marie (KT) Basile of the Academy for the Arts, Science & Technology and Socastee High School won Best in Show in the High School Division, an overall win among all categories at the secondary level of grades 9-12. Kyrah Cox, of the Academy for the Arts, Science & Technology and Socastee High School, won first place in 12th grade two-dimensional design. Graysann Compton, of the Academy for the Arts, Science & Technology and Myrtle Beach High School won first place in 12th grade three-dimensional design.

All three winning students are taught by Jamie Franklin who teaches advanced art at the Academy for the Arts, Science & Technology.

 

image Best in Show
High School Division

image
Katelynn Basile

Artist’s description:
“We are all connected through the ground on which we stand. Energy flows through the soil, plants, trees and people. Likewise, a river of lines flows through the wood, each individual grain indicating the passage of time and the transfer of energy. The soft angles, high and low points of the human face, suggest this movement in our own bodies. The way in which light catches on certain areas but doesn't reach the valleys of another, it's all energy, connecting us in our differences.”

Basile, Katelynn (KT). The Ground on Which We Stand. 2019, oil on wood, the Academy for the Arts, Science & Technology and Socastee High School, Myrtle Beach.

 

First Place
12th grade, two-dimensional design
First Place
Kyrah Cox

Artist’s description:
“Blue and red. Contrasting colors. On one side you see a man, nothing else to it… just a man. But when you put on the blue glasses you see everything that makes him who he is. Not his emotions and feelings, but his brain and veins. I used the idea of contrasting drawings to represent a concept that’s prominent in our society today of contrasting perspectives and ideas. In the climate of today’s society, different perspectives are always at contrast. I wanted to show how the two drawings are different and separate, but how they come together as one in the end. Thinking outside of the box, I wanted to show Physical movement and not just metaphorical movement by making the viewer switch glasses to see the two perspectives. Everyone has at least two forms of movement throughout their body, the movement of ideas and thought, and the movement of blood through veins, physically moving the body. These two movements combine to make us the people we are. Without either of these movements, we wouldn't be alive mentally and physically. The blood moving through our bodies keeps us alive and the ideas moving through our brains keep us individual.”

Cox, Kyrah. Anaglyph Man. 2019, pen and ink/cellophane red/cellophane blue, the Academy for the Arts, Science & Technology and Socastee High School, Myrtle Beach.

Blue

 

HCS 3rd place First Place
12th grade, three-dimensional design

Grayseen
Graysann Compton

Artist’s description:
“To create this work, I used carbonated metal and filler wire. I chose to make this piece using carbonated metal because of the darker color. I wanted this turtle to look more realistic, so using a dull metal worked better than using stainless steel. To create this piece, I used a plasma cutter to cut out relatively similar square shapes. After the shapes were cut, I pounded them over a metal pipe to curve the centers of the squares. Then using a mig, I welded to edges of the first layer of squares together in a circular shape. Using the other pieces, I added more layers to build the rest of the turtle’s body. The legs and head of the turtle were attached last, and the nails were added by drilling holes in the legs then fitting the filler wire in them.”

Compton, Graysann. Turtle. 2019, metal/plasma cut/welding, the Academy for the Arts, Science & Technology and Myrtle Beach High School, Myrtle Beach.